The genus Centris contains circa 250 species of large apid bees occurring in the Neotropical and Nearctic regions, from Kansas to Argentina. Most females of these bees possess adaptations for carrying floral oils rather than (or in addition to) pollen or nectar. They visit mainly plants of the family Malpighiaceae to collect oil, but also Plantaginaceae, Calceolariaceae, Krameriaceae and others. Recent studies have shown they are sister to the corbiculate bees, the most well-known and economically important group of bees [1]
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Le lieux de travail pour moi est un inconvénient. Il n'y a pas grand chose autour et c'est un peu isolé. Les avantages sociaux (exemple, les assurances) sont un peu limités et il n'y a pas de contributions au fond de pension de l'employé, ce que je trouve déplorable. Les opportunités de carrière sont aussi un peu limitées, mais ça ne sera pas un problème pour moi avant quelques années puisque mon poste me convient parfaitement.
Apple released three computers bearing the Centris name: the Centris 610 (replacing the Macintosh IIsi) and Centris 650 (replacing the Macintosh IIci in form and the Quadra 700 in function), both of which were introduced in March 1993,[1] and the Centris 660AV which followed in July. Apple also considered the Macintosh IIvx to be part of the Centris line. The IIvx was released in October of the previous year, but, according to Apple, their lawyers were unable to complete the trademark check on the "Centris" name in time for the IIvx's release.[1]
Apple released three computers bearing the Centris name: the Centris 610 (replacing the Macintosh IIsi) and Centris 650 (replacing the Macintosh IIci in form and the Quadra 700 in function), both of which were introduced in March 1993,[1] and the Centris 660AV which followed in July. Apple also considered the Macintosh IIvx to be part of the Centris line. The IIvx was released in October of the previous year, but, according to Apple, their lawyers were unable to complete the trademark check on the "Centris" name in time for the IIvx's release.[1]
Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
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