There is a size correlation which determines whether males become patrollers or hoverers. Patrollers tend to be larger so that they can better protect and copulate with emerging females. Smaller males are usually unable to compete as well, and so have to make the best out of a bad situation; thus, they become hoverers. Each group has a different set of behaviors. The patrollers move over a large space containing many other patrollers. Usually, patrollers will frequent the same spots over the course of their lives. Since the area is so large, the cost to defend it against other patrollers would be much greater than the potential mating benefits, so the patrollers show very little territoriality.[11] Patroller males will usually only fight when a breeding female is near. In contrast, each hoverer stakes out an area of about one meter in diameter. These areas don’t overlap with other hoverers. Any fast moving object (i.e. bee, dragonfly, leaf, etc.) that enters a territory will be quickly chased. The chase allows the male bee to determine if a female is unmated, or if an enemy male is in his territory. If it is a male bee, the territory owner will chase it out, but not beyond the boundary of the territory. What is interesting is that every day (or even every several hours) the territory holder will abandon the area to establish a new zone. Often the male will never return to the vacated area, and it will be taken over by another male. This shows that hoverers show a low site tendency but strong territoriality.[11] A balanced ratio of patrollers to hoverers is maintained, and thus, this ratio is an evolutionary stable strategy. If more males become patrollers, then the hoverers will benefit from the reduced competition, and the hoverers' genes will spread until the stable ratio is returned to. The same thing will happen if more males become hoverers.
Le patrimoine architectural de Québec comprend l'ensemble des bâtiments de l'Assemblée nationale qui ont été érigés sur la colline Parlementaire à partir de 1877. On y retrouve deux styles architecturaux, soit le style Second Empire pour l'Hôtel du Parlement et l'architecture Beaux-Arts pour les autres édifices. La Citadelle de Québec, construite entre 1820 et 1831, le Château Frontenac, bâti entre 1892 et 1893, et la Terrasse Dufferin font également partie du site patrimonial du Vieux-Québec.
Le bâtiment offre une vue panoramique sur la ville de Québec et les Laurentides. Avec ses 40 mètres de hauteur, l’immeuble possède la plus haute structure faite de bois massif à 100 % dans le monde. Les écocondos Origine offrent un confort absolu aux résidents avec son gymnase et salon privé, terrasse extérieure commune avec piscine chauffée, espace BBQ et végétation.
Centris pallida is a species of solitary bee native to North America. It lacks an accepted common name; however, it has been called the digger bee, the desert bee, and the pallid bee due to its actions, habitat, and color respectively. The solitary nature of this bee allows for a dual-strategy mating system which produces an evolutionarily stable state resistant to invading strategies. These bees have also evolved to withstand the high temperatures of their native habitat. C. pallida routinely has internal temperatures within 3 degrees Celsius of death.
Four varieties of bacteria have been found in the bee bread of the larva: Bacillus circulans, B. coagulans, B. firmus, and B. megaterium. Only the Bacillus genus has been found in the samples taken. Together, these four species were able to hydrolyze starch, ferment glucose, convert nitrates to nitrites, and produce dihydroxyacetone from glycerol. This group of bacteria also lowers the pH of the bee bread. These functions serve not only to protect the larva from other bacteria, but they also digest complex molecules which allow the larva to easily absorb nutrients without expending a lot of energy. The bacteria, in turn, receive a supply of food which results in a mutualistic relationship.[13]
Centris pallida was officially discovered and catalogued by William J. Fox in 1899 near Phoenix, Arizona.[1] Fox also discovered Centris cockerelli, Centris errans, and Sphex subhyalinus. This species is closely related to Centris cockerelli in terms of habitat and genus, but is different in terms of mating, color, and subgenus.[2] This bee also belongs to the superfamily Apoidea, and the subfamily Apinae.[1]

Ceux qui préfèrent un environnement tranquille se plairont à Québec. On peut trouver un parc à une certaine distance de la majorité des maisons et les résidents peuvent compter sur la présence de quelques centaines d'espaces verts publics, comme par exemple la Base de plein air de Sainte-Foy et le Parc des Champs-de-Bataille, ce qui fait qu'ils sont faciles d'accès. La ville plaira également à ceux qui préfèrent les environnements silencieux, étant donné qu'il y a peu de bruit lié à la circulation automobile - même si plusieurs secteurs de la ville sont plus bruyants, comme par exemple près de l'une des 3 voies ferrées, de l'Autoroute Félix-Leclerc, de l'Autoroute Henri-IV ou de l'aéroport (YQB).  Quebec - Lire davantage à propos des propriétés à vendre dans cette région
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